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Captain America and the Falcon #13
Captain America and the Falcon #13
Reviewed by Randy Jackson
Written by Christopher Priest , Art by Dan Jurgens, Nelson with Pond Scum
Publisher: Marvel Comics

Synopsis: The Anti-Cap is running around and killing America’s supposed enemies. Meanwhile, Cap comes to talk to Sam about his recent behavior. When Sam stands up for himself, he and Cap argue, and Cap decides to dissolve the team. Meanwhile, Leila’s boyfriend comes after Sam with a gun because he blames Sam for his falling out with Leila. He fires some shots, and though they miss Sam, they strike Cap. Sam takes Cap to the hospital, where he has a life and death struggle—which he loses. Sam shaves off his beard and goes to face the Anti-Cap.

Good Stuff: I really think Priest does an excellent job of not just understanding who Captain America is, but also in terms of what he represents to those people around him, and the different ways in which they interpret who he is and what he’s all about. Sam’s words about everyone needing to meet his approval made a lot of sense to me, even though you could never imagine Captain America saying so, or even intentionally meaning to give that impression. That was a very good conversation.

I also enjoyed the flashbacks that were intended to represent Cap’s mental processes while he was on the operating table, and while I seriously doubt that he’s dead (he does have his own self-titled comic, plus appearing in a number of other comics. I’m sure he’ll “get better” by next issue) it was still a very good scene. I’m also looking forward to the fight next issue between Anti-Cap and the Falcon—it should be fun, and I’d be shocked if Cap didn’t get involved as well.

Not so Good Stuff: Well, I had a hard time believing that the Falcon could dodge those bullets and Captain America couldn’t.

I give this book 8/10.


Detective Comics #804
Reviewed by Randy Jackson
Written by David Lapham, Mike Carey , Art by Ramon Bachs, Nathan Massengill, John Lucas
Publisher: DC Comics

Synopsis: Robin keeps a man who has murdered his wife from murdering his baby as well. The man jumps out of the window, but there’s no body to be found.

Mr. Freeze has kidnapped a pregnant girl and a priest, and wants the priest to marry the two of them. Meanwhile, the Ventriloquist’s gang finds out that Freeze has gone rogue, so they try to hit him. Batman goes to Arkham to investigate a psychiatrist who’s just killed himself, then goes to track down Freeze. The Ventriloquist’s men attempt to kill Freeze; in the process, Freeze is wounded and his suit is compromised, but he kills most of the Ventriloquist’s men.

In the backup piece, The Barker the villain is revealed.

Good Stuff: Well, there’s a ton of stuff going on, and hopefully Lapham will start bringing it together soon.

The Barker wasn’t great, but it was reasonably entertaining.

Not so Good Stuff: I’m honestly unsure if Lapham is attempting to write a Batman story, a mystery, or just a James Ellroy style crime novel. Don’t get me wrong, I like my Batman dark, but I also want that darkness to come from the story, and not just be the flavor of everything. I read comics like Detective for a cool, fun (not funny) story, not to be assaulted with things I prefer not to think about generally.

Speaking of dark, the coloring palette once again rears it’s ugly head. I can appreciate that the idea of a dark atmosphere, but the utter and total murkiness is becoming truly annoying.

I give this book 3/10.

Detective Comics #804

Fallen Angel #19
Fallen Angel #19
Reviewed by Randy Jackson
Written by Peter David , Art by David Lopez, Fernando Blanco
Publisher: DC Comics

Synopsis: Sachs and Violens come to Bete Noir to chase down a child pornography ring. Meanwhile, Lee is violently taking out her many frustrations on the clientele of Furors. When Dolph tells her to leave and not come back until she’s done something about her anger. She goes to Bumper Ruggs’s bordello to find a good time. When Sachs and Violens show up coming after Ruggs, she offers Lee a free lifetime membership if she’ll get rid of them. Lee agrees.

Good Stuff: I don’t really know what to make of Sachs and Violens, but they are intriguing. Also intriguing—now that the main mystery is out of the way—is this latest chapter in Lee’s life. I liked the idea that she thinks that casual sex might be the way to alleviate her tensions, and I also like her current somewhat directionless state.

Not so Good Stuff: Everything is still a little murky right now, at least to me. I’m sure the next issue will clear up a lot, but for the moment I’m a tad confused by things.

I give this book 8/10.


Justice League Unlimited #7
Reviewed by Randy Jackson
Written by Adam Beechen , Art by Ethen Beavers
Publisher: DC Comics

Synopsis: After running away from the Kent’s in Smallville because “they don’t understand me”, Supergirl and the rest of the Justice League battle Darkseid who once again is attempting to get to the Source.

Good Stuff: This was fun. Lots of fun.

I liked seeing the various leaguers including J’onn working together on such a scale, and I enjoyed the way everything was resolved when the most powerful members went down. Kara’s speech to Darkseid was quite good, and I think Beechen did a really nice job of getting inside of her head and her speech patterns.

Not so Good Stuff: I respect the fact that Beavers is attempting to emulate the style of the TV cartoon, but his efforts just don’t have that clean line, and looks a little slapdash.

I give this book 9/10.

Justice League Unlimited #7

Soulsearchers and Company #70
Reviewed by Randy Jackson
Written by Peter David , Art by John Heebink, Al Milgrom
Publisher: Claypool Comics

Synopsis: Kelly continues her undercover work at the Woodstarke’s bank, and uncovers a plot that goes to the very roots of the Soulsearchers.

Good Stuff: This is a “jumping on” issue of Soulsearchers and Company (a fact which is used frequently in the book to justify the massive amount of exposition), and it’s really quite useful. More importantly, despite all of the exposition, one actually gets the feeling that something is happening, which had been missing during the entirety of Bridget and Baraka’s honeymoon. It’s very nice to see things moving forward.

Not so Good Stuff: While I recognize that this is supposed to be a humor magazine, I do wish that the creators would tone down the puns and easy jokes a little and actually focus on making this a more consistently fun read. There are some good characters here, and it would be very nice to see them developed into something more than two-dimensional stereotypes.

I give this book 8/10.



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